User Research Masterclass – CPD at UCL 8th March 2016

1-day User Research Masterclass: Developing User Driven Products delivered by Julia Shalet, Product Doctor download

When is it?   Tuesday, 8 March 2016 from 09:00 to 17:00. The course is part of a series from UCL Advances at UCL in London

Who is it for?   Entrepreneurs, Product Managers, Designers and Marketers who seek a deeper understanding of their customers and users to inform proposition and product development.

What does it cover?   Many products fail as they are based on assumptions about the problems that people may have, what solutions they want and how they are going to behave when you put that solution in their hands.

This workshop will encourage you to face these assumptions; take a scientific approach to validate them using a structured framework and to develop your ability to carry out effective research – with lots of hand-on practice with your own case studies throughout the day.

The Workshop is in 4 parts:

Part 1 – Identify the risky assumptions we have made about how people feel, think and behave
Part 2 – Design research experiments to test out those risky assumptions with the right people
Part 3 – Get tips on how to carry out the different types of User Research to get at those assumptions
Part 4 – Work out what to do with results you get

Enter “ProductDoctor” for a 50% discount, reducing the price down to £100. Book here

 

Scrum Masters running Experiments

I ran a session with the Agile Practitioners Meetup last week – it was an extract from workshops I run including those at The Mobile Academy.  It was a very effective demonstration of how to “co-curate” using examples and best practice from the room. With scrum masters from many different businesses including Read International, GiffGaff, Natwest, TFL, Squirrel and Pearson, there were lots of examples of assumptions being made about how customers feel, will behave and problems that they have.

Working in groups, each of these businesses was able to use the format in the presentation below to define experiments to reduce those risks. Critique flowed freely with good discussions took on topics like “Is Linkedin really a good way to recruit respondents?”, “How useful are surveys at enabling you to understand real pain felt by a customer?”, “How to use research sessions as a way to get Developers customer centricity”.

I urge Scrum Masters to share this approach with Product Owners as it will help them to truly represent their customers. It matters not if you deliver a product perfectly if it is not what the customer wants or needs.

Here is some feedback from a willing Scrum Master!

The Mobile Academy next runs from 1 Oct – 3 Dec at Idea London in Shoreditch. Get £100 off with code: Leanmob

Making the call on Usability fixes

Getting input from a wonderfully engaged audience!

A great question from the back!

We got in to one of my favourite discussions at one of my DIY User Research workshop at FFWD London.  I demonstrated how to run a number of different types of research and had the group practice for themselves.  One great question was around how diligent to be on fixing user experience glitches.

Years of research with the youth market has shown that they do not necessarily like to use products that are too “scripted” – at the extreme, experiences that have in-built tutorials. They tell me that half the fun of starting to use a new app or product is to work out how to use it. That is part of the “game” (their language). They enjoy learning how to use a product and are happy to find their own way around. So fixing every single little glitch might not be a good thing to do – crazy though it may sound.

Now having said all of that, I need to temper it

1) “Hygiene” processes need to be as simple and pain-free as possible. Examples of “hygiene” being registration, sign in, and most importantly, payment! Serious impact for your business if there are any issues here.

2) It does somewhat depend on the product and the segment. If you are a mobile banking app, people are using you for efficiency and convenience – and a glitchy experience is going to put people off and reduce their confidence – the last thing a bank needs. This is also a good example of where you need to think about the segment. My first point above is a younger user, but it would seem that older users, experiencing a banking app would not really find working it out “fun”. Annoying, more like.

3) The product could be SO worth it! My example here is Pinterest. I love Pinterest. It is really useful for me to discover and organise home decor images for my pending house move (fingers crossed!) and I love the convenience of being able to share my boards. There are lots of incidents where I feel that the product is not intuitive and where I am forced through tutorials for new features. But I love it – so useful – and honestly, my love is not diminished by these usability downers.

I love running these workshops – the conversations that flow, the light bulbs that go off and the questions that make me think. Please comment away on this post.