What Product Doctor did in 2015

2015 Brands I worked with

Some Clients from 2015

First off – here’s to a happy, healthy and rewarding 2016!

In 2015 I worked with innovators from startups to large organisations; practising, teaching and coaching people-centred brand, proposition and product/service development. (Some call this “Customer Development”).

I have further evolved my range of “insightful and engaging” workshops, designed to reduce wasted time and money by making sure we deliver what end users and customers want throughout the product lifecycle. My next workshop is a “User Research Masterclass” – one of the CPD Certified “Short Courses for Entrepreneurs” at UCL and is on 8th March. UCL have kindly offered my contacts 50% off (reducing the price to £100) with discount code: “ProductDoctor”. You can book here: http://bit.ly/1OVeyrD. Let me know if you plan to come along – be great to see you!

To maintain diversity in my portfolio, I always leave time for new projects, so read on – I hope it will spark opportunities for us to work together:

1. Large Organisations
I have been helping Pearson, the largest education company and book publisher in the world, get lean (i.e. to become more profitable). Over the past 9 months I have established a new Product Coach programme to expedite digital innovation across the product lifecycle using lean, data driven and user-centred approaches. I have focussed on contextualising toolkits and methodologies to help product teams become more relevant to their target segments. We received Best Innovation Culture and Best Innovation Program awards at the 2015 Corporate Entrepreneur Awards in both US and UK, beating Unilever, Guardian Labs and Coca Cola.

As part of this programme, I have been running my workshops encouraging participants to admit risky assumptions they are making about how people think and behave, turn these assumptions into testable statements, design research to gather evidence to reduce those risks, choose the right research methods and practice how to have the most effective customer conversations. From these workshops, I produced a series of internal training videos which are to be watched across the global business.

While the internal challenges for large organisations to innovate has not changed over the past 10 years, there is an explosion of startup and SMEs harnessing opportunities offered by new technology, finding innovative and relevant ways to reach their target customers. If you are experiencing these challenges in your organisation and want to sharpen your approach, perhaps we can start talking…

Here I am with lovely Pearson colleagues: Shannon, Hope, Shirley, Stef (and said award!)

2. Smaller Organisations & Startups
I have had a brilliant range of hands-on research projects this past year – including a new holistic fitness app called Kiqplan from Fitbug; a service helping the visually impaired; a pay as you go music service and an innovative messaging service. I have helped them develop brand, value proposition, feature set, roadmap and usability.

So before you engage expensive agencies or decide not to do it at all (arghhh!) give me a shout – I’ll also offer to train your staff as we go through the process.

3. Industry, Community & Education
I hosted a Startup Village at Apps World (Informa) for Mobile Monday London where 12 companies had the opportunity to showcase their new products and make great connections. I was a judge at Battlehack London, Braintree’s flagship hackathon (part of PayPal) and for the IPA’s (Institute of Promotional Advertising) annual awards.

I worked with the newly awarded OBE Dr Sue Black, creating new business models for #techmums, which set her up to get a place on the Barclays Accelerator.

Through my Directorship at Azenby, I have continued to work with GSMA (the global association for the mobile telecoms industry) providing mobile industry training alongside the wonderful Bill Best – we have a great deck covering technical, regulatory, business models and ecosystem changes – industry history lessons also offered in the portfolio!

In addition to UCL, I have delivered workshops for General Assembly, Apps World Startup Launchpad (as part of a “DIY Series” with Hai Media), App Promotion Summit, London Agile Practitioners Meetup, Accelerators and finally returning to my annual stint at Over the Air Hackathon.

Presentations, insights, outcomes and testimonials are here on my website. Be great to hear your news and about any interesting ways we can work together in 2016 – feel free to also pass on the discount code to my Masterclass.

Best and thanks for reading!

Julia

User Research Masterclass – CPD at UCL 8th March 2016

1-day User Research Masterclass: Developing User Driven Products delivered by Julia Shalet, Product Doctor download

When is it?   Tuesday, 8 March 2016 from 09:00 to 17:00. The course is part of a series from UCL Advances at UCL in London

Who is it for?   Entrepreneurs, Product Managers, Designers and Marketers who seek a deeper understanding of their customers and users to inform proposition and product development.

What does it cover?   Many products fail as they are based on assumptions about the problems that people may have, what solutions they want and how they are going to behave when you put that solution in their hands.

This workshop will encourage you to face these assumptions; take a scientific approach to validate them using a structured framework and to develop your ability to carry out effective research – with lots of hand-on practice with your own case studies throughout the day.

The Workshop is in 4 parts:

Part 1 – Identify the risky assumptions we have made about how people feel, think and behave
Part 2 – Design research experiments to test out those risky assumptions with the right people
Part 3 – Get tips on how to carry out the different types of User Research to get at those assumptions
Part 4 – Work out what to do with results you get

Enter “ProductDoctor” for a 50% discount, reducing the price down to £100. Book here

 

Start Up Advice

ffwd-logoYesterday I returned for an afternoon of mentoring on the first day of the new FFWD London Pre-Accelerator cohort.

Here are six themes that recurred:

1). Where is it you personally are trying to go?
I asked a number of founders where they actually wanted to go with their product – what was their personal vision? Some were after an exit and others wanted to be the CEOs of their business seeing their roadmap through to highly profitable businesses.

The responses were interesting in that not many had considered this question and once we played out the various answers, the relevance of asking the question early on became apparent. For example, take a business offering software packages to automate accounting processes: If they were building to sell out to one of the big four, they are more likely to focus their product set and proposition to client and personnel within those large organisations. If they were to be a self-managed independent business, they might be more likely to adopt a licence fee business model that caters for smaller sized firms and even to consider targeting the end clients / companies who employ the accountants, with offers that could reduce their accounting fees.

2. The Gift of a Physical Offering in a Digital Space
If your offering has a physical element to it there are a whole range of opportunities open for you to engage with and market to your end customer. Example: a “find a flatmate” business – why not set up a Meet Up group that invites those looking for flatmates to get together and meet each other? What a great way to find out what questions they ask each other – informing the questions you are going to build in to your online / mobile form. You will also be able to spot trends that help you to identify your market segments – as an example, perhaps this is very attractive to females of a particular age and situation?

It is interesting to draw a parallel with Match.com, who started fully online and have now integrated physical meetups and events to bolster their offering. As an ongoing strategy, having a physical element to your offering helps people to engage more deeply with your brand as they meet you, feel the atmosphere that you create and at the same time, help you to develop your offering. Win Win!

3. Understanding all the People in your Universe: People Centred Innovation
As we try to identify our target user and customer, we also come across different people that are in our scene / our “universe”. I tried out a quick exercise where some of the founders listed out the different groups of people that are in their universe. These are not necessarily customers or users, but potential collaborators, influencers and people in the value chain. Understanding all of these different people is incredibly useful. Profiling who is in your scene is an important piece of research – it can challenge what category you have put them in to – perhaps you discover new distribution channels or new end customers. This really can only be carried out in person. Look in to the eyes of people; feel their emotion; see their response; understand their motivation; then you can talk from a position of knowledge rather than assumption. I guarantee you will always find out something that you didn’t know.

Example: A discussion around the accounting landscape identified that a group initially thought of as potential customers could actually be a distribution channel.

4. Start on your Doorstep
The start up London scene is immense – with so many accelerators, courses, incubators and so on. If you are lucky enough to have a proposition where your target user is in this scene already, then it is somewhat of a gift – you are already on the inside! For example, the people that run the FFWD London programme are linked with a lot of the other players on the scene and no doubt have ways to get to the various co-ordinators of the many programmes and their databases. So, use it!

Another variation on this theme of doorstep starting with a fashion duo working on a new idea to offer affordable but high end dresses. They suspect their prime segment to be working women in their early 30s – many of whom you will find in this scene – a great place to start. An interesting follow on question came from this fashion duo – they knew that it was not a great idea to carry out early concept testing with their friends – although they are target market. The advice in this case is to ask friends and colleagues to introduce you to someone that fits their particular profile, so you are quite rightly more removed from the respondent.

5. Opening the Kimono
Creating an MVP is critical to getting your product out of the door. As we all know, it enables you to gather early feedback, create an early adopter base who will help co-design your future product and it starts your brand journey. I found myself encouraging some of the founders to be bolder in their brand vision. I think that it is good to sell a vision as long as you are not making promises to deliver particular functionality in specific timeframes.

Example: An App that enables restaurant go-ers to find out more about the menu is part of a broader vision to bring smaller restaurateurs the kind of analytics that are available to larger establishments, without the accompanying price tag. The business model is that the restaurant will be paying to be on the system. So why not sell them the broader vision; they are an early adopter of the first feature set and the intention is that they are in for the long haul journey.

Open the kimono – give them a flash of what you have – there is a strong marketing message associated with being the first in. Often benefits (usually price related) will follow for them in the longer term. Again, these early adopters will be the ones that inform your future product. Stay close to them. There is no harm with labelling your MVP – “BETA” is a known and accepted label for example – it means that there may well be clunks and a limited product set as this is an early stage of the product.

6. Don’t hide your Light under a Bushel
I met three founders who were building products based on their own insider-industry experience. With so much digital innovation out there, it is really important to show credibility and not be afraid to shout about it!

Example: One of the founders is 25 and is building an online training offering for entrepreneurs of “lifestyle” businesses. It sounded initially clichéd, with concepts like “gamification”. I boldly asked his age and what experience he had that qualified him to be coaching others. He went on to tell me (in a very modest way) how he had built up three successful offerings all profit-generating. I suggested that part of his elevator pitch would be to start with a bio of his top three successes (I don’t apologise for always thinking in threes!). Instant credibility. Not just another online training platform: a business built around sharing his personal experience.